Modern wedding invitation can be more subtle than its traditional counterpart, yet still suitable for couples planning a religious ceremony. With modern wedding invites, the parents are mentioned as a courtesy as opposed to the main focus as in other versions. Sometimes the parents are not mentioned at all, especially if the couple is hosting the event. Again, there is much more flexibility with colors, fonts, and sentence cases. Check out a few modern wedding invitations samples below.


Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.

If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."


Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.

Make an upcoming wedding celebration becomes a memorable event, including all the loving and supportive family, relatives, and friend. If you want to have a vibrant or vintage invitation card frame for it, choose one from our wide selection of premium wedding invitation templates that you can download for free. Our files are ready-made with professionally designed content for your convenience. Enjoy creative and beautifully crafted files that make use of high-quality layout, artwork, images, text, and graphics. Printable and can be shared digitally through email and other online platforms. Easily editable in all versions of Adobe Photoshop (psd), Illustrator (.ai), Indesign, Microsoft Word (.doc), Publisher, Apple Pages, and Google Docs. You can save the downloaded file on your PC or mobile device. So get the most elegant for your event. Get access to our card template library with just one click on our pocket-friendly subscription today!
If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.
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The Host Line: The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding. In times past, the bride’s family always hosted (and paid for) the wedding. Thankfully, those days are done. Hosting the wedding is, in the end, a (mostly meaningless) honor that you get to choose how to pass out. Both (or all) your sets/singles of parents can be listed as hosts. If you have five sets of parents and you want to list them all—go for it. One set of parents might be listed as hosts. You can host the wedding yourself, in which case the lines are reversed “Terry and Renee invite you to…” or the host line is omitted entirely. You can also make the host line more general “Together with their families.” There are two issues worth noting here. Firstly, no matter who says what in the course of guilting you, the host line on the wedding invitation isn’t for sale; it’s an honor that you should bestow in a way that makes you feel comfortable. Names are not listed in order of who paid more (or who paid at all). And secondly, this particular honor is generally only used for the living (since these people are, ostensibly, inviting you to a party). A common way to honor the dead is to alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Renee Smith, daughter of Beth Smith,” or “Renee Smith, daughter of Iris Milfrid and the late Beth Smith.”
Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
In this case, the invitation includes the bride's parents’ names, so you can omit the bride's last name (unless she has a different last name than her parents). On the following line, write out the groom’s entire name. LGBTQ+ wedding invitation wording should follow similar guidelines. The host of the celebration (read: the party footing the bill) is listed first, followed by their son or daughter’s name, followed by their son or daughter’s partner’s name. If the couple is hosting themselves, names are typically listed in alphabetical order.
The Host Line: The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding. In times past, the bride’s family always hosted (and paid for) the wedding. Thankfully, those days are done. Hosting the wedding is, in the end, a (mostly meaningless) honor that you get to choose how to pass out. Both (or all) your sets/singles of parents can be listed as hosts. If you have five sets of parents and you want to list them all—go for it. One set of parents might be listed as hosts. You can host the wedding yourself, in which case the lines are reversed “Terry and Renee invite you to…” or the host line is omitted entirely. You can also make the host line more general “Together with their families.” There are two issues worth noting here. Firstly, no matter who says what in the course of guilting you, the host line on the wedding invitation isn’t for sale; it’s an honor that you should bestow in a way that makes you feel comfortable. Names are not listed in order of who paid more (or who paid at all). And secondly, this particular honor is generally only used for the living (since these people are, ostensibly, inviting you to a party). A common way to honor the dead is to alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Renee Smith, daughter of Beth Smith,” or “Renee Smith, daughter of Iris Milfrid and the late Beth Smith.”
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
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