Now that you have the basics covered, it’s time to get specific. The first question is; who’s name goes first, the bride or the groom? Traditionally, whoever is hosting the wedding will get first billing. This is usually the Bride’s parents, making the Bride’s name the appropriate choice. In cases where there are co-hosts or two brides, the couple will have to decide for themselves. If you’re having difficulty, say the names out loud and see if any option has a better ring to it.

Create your own wedding color theme. With the capability to revise each section on the invite to one of over 160 colors you have the capability to put together a color theme that is truly distinct. Don't settle for an online invite company that limits you to three or four predefined color schemes. Expect more and build your own distinct wedding color theme with Basic Invite where your color preferences are unlimited.

For more specifics, we’ve provided some wedding invitation wording samples that vary from classic to whimsical. Note: if you like any of the invitations featured in this post, you can get them from Zola’s brand new line of printed wedding invitations and save-the-dates (you may already know Zola for being one of the first truly modern online wedding registries and for their actually useful planning tools.) While they didn’t sponsor this post, we do get a small commission every time you sign up for their free planning tools or purchase your wedding invitations through them, which is how we’re able to provide this content to you for free. Plus they’re stylish and affordable and currently 30% off until the beginning of February when you use the code PAPER30, so win/win.
In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster), they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express anything from your values to the kind of wedding you’re going to have to your artistic taste. But wedding invitation wording still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)
The wording on your invitation should correspond with the formality and style of your wedding. From formal to casual, the wording should reflect the formality and tone you’d like to set. Every wedding invitation should include these elements: host{s}, couple getting married, time, date and location. Be inspired! Choose wording that complements your situation, style, and spirit of your wedding.
If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.
Not sure how to word your wedding invitations? It might seem simple at first, but once you get started, you may realize that crafting the perfect wedding invitation wording can be a little tricky—there are etiquette rules to navigate and maybe a couple of sticky situations to figure out. But in a nutshell, the wording of your invitation should reflect the overall vibe of your wedding day. Ready to get started? We've compiled this guide to wedding invitation wording and etiquette right here.
Casual wedding invitation wording is the polar opposite of traditional invites. All of the usual information is still included, but we love the room for creativity this style provides, especially when it comes to humor. This style of wedding invitation wording also leaves plenty of room for poetry and quotes, and to go crazy with elaborate descriptions of the upcoming event.
“The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service. Some couples opt to spell "honour" using the British spelling; both are correct but spelling it with a "u" evokes a more formal and traditional feel. (Note: If you're using "honour" on the invitation, we recommend matching it with "favour" as in "favour of your reply" on the RSVP card.)

It is not needed to place the entourage in the invite. You can have a different piece of paper detailing the members that can be put in choose invitations-- specifically those that go to the entourage themselves, and also to the a lot more instant family and good friends. They would value the memento; plus, it is a way of thanking them for their participation.
“The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service. Some couples opt to spell "honour" using the British spelling; both are correct but spelling it with a "u" evokes a more formal and traditional feel. (Note: If you're using "honour" on the invitation, we recommend matching it with "favour" as in "favour of your reply" on the RSVP card.)

If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.

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