Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.
You can absolutely switch up your wedding invitation wording to include the name of a deceased loved. One tactful and meaningful way to do this is to change the format slightly to accommodate the word "late" in front of your family member’s name. (Beyond the invitation wording, you have plenty of ways to honor a deceased parent during your ceremony and reception.) It can look something like this.
It might seem awkward, yet it can be done. Other couples have chosen to simply consist of the names of their biological parents, referencing their existing last names. That works just.
One of the most important elements of your big and unforgettable day is your wedding invitation. Every young couple puts emphasis on this, since this is the first impression for your guests, hinting what the wedding will be like. Moreover, this is something that the guests will keep as a memory. It can be quite difficult to decide on what the perfect wedding invitation should look like and how to make it truly unique, but elegant at the same time. To help you out, we have collected a few great handmade wedding invitations for you. You’ll not only be able to find classic and sophisticated ideas, but also modern and extravagant ones. Naturally, you can get creative and play around with the colour schemes according to your own taste. Now, let’s see which DIY wedding invitation cards you like the best!
The first line of the invitation is dedicated to the host of the wedding, also known as the party covering the expenses. Traditionally, the bride’s parents paid for the wedding but with changing times, the groom’s parents, bride and groom, or a combination of all three are contributing. There is no official order or requirement to list the names. It’s all up to personal preference.
Wedding invitation etiquette dictates that the dress code, if it's to be included on the invitation, is is the lower right hand corner of the invitation. If you don't include a note on attire, the invitation will indicate the dress code. For example, if the invitation is very fancy, guests will likely anticipating a formal, black-tie affair, or conversely, if the invitation on the simpler side, that indicates a more casual dress code.
Traditional wedding invitation wording has spent decades slowly evolving into what we see today. The past few decades, however, have been the most drastic. Not to worry. traditional wording for wedding invites can be easily adapted to work for our modern families including divorced parents, single parents, multiple sets of parents, and all of the other structures. This structured wedding invitation wording also works perfectly well for couples who are hosting their own celebration.
This next section of formal wedding invitation samples focuses on the groom’s parents hosting the event. You’ll see that it shares a lot of similarities with the previous samples, but also some clear differences. We’ll also take a look at how to word wedding invites for when both sets of parents co-host, and when one set hosts but want to show respect to the other parents.
If the bride or groom's parents are divorced and you want to include both as hosts, you can include them all, just keep your each parent on a separate line. If you're going to include the name of stepparent, keep it on the same line. It might seem complex at first, but all it requires is a few more lines. This is an example of a bride with divorced (and remarried) parents' wedding invitation wording:
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Even though we're serious stationery lovers, it's okay if all you really want out of your wedding invitation is a piece of paper that informs guests of a date, time and a location. If a simple invite is more your style and you want to keep paper costs low you can go the DIY printable template route—just remember anytime you take on a sizable wedding task solo there may be a couple more headaches in store. For example, if you don't have access to a high-quality printer or a hefty ink supply you're going to run into some issues. If you have an extra long guest list, you'll be camped out at the printer feeding it paper for a couple solid hours.

Making your own wedding invitation doesn't need to like you're on a budget or that you're starved for creative ability. The best and most effective style is often the simplest. Try this easy and uncluttered invitation that can be colour schemed and patterned to suit your wishes. At the end of the day, handmade invitations are an extremely touching way of expressing your personal input into the wedding process.
There you have it: Everything you need to know about wedding invitation wording etiquette, complete with twenty-two example of how brides handled their own wording. Hopefully these real invites will help guide you as you create your own. No matter what you choose, keep it true to your own tastes and you'll come up with a wedding invitation you'll treasure forever!
Many invitations start with "Mr. and Mrs. So and So wish to announce the marriage of their daughter Blah to John Doe, kid of Mr. and Mrs. Smith." In order to consist of both collections of parents, you can simply include them in at the beginning and end, denoting it with kid of Mrs. Smith and also her partner Expense and of Mr. Whatever and his partner Something.
Not sure how to word your wedding invitations? It might seem simple at first, but once you get started, you may realize that crafting the perfect wedding invitation wording can be a little tricky—there are etiquette rules to navigate and maybe a couple of sticky situations to figure out. But in a nutshell, the wording of your invitation should reflect the overall vibe of your wedding day. Ready to get started? We've compiled this guide to wedding invitation wording and etiquette right here.

When guests open their wedding invitation, the first thing they see is your overall design. Your design should reflect the personal style of your wedding. There are many invitation styles to choose from — ornate, minimalist, rustic, vintage, artistic, whimsical, classic or modern. Consider including some of these additional design elements in your wedding invitation:


Whichever kind of wedding invitation to go with, they should have an eye-catching design or creative invitation. It would help grab your guests’ attention, at the same time, maintain the theme and overall aesthetics that you want your wedding to have. Crafting the perfect invitation is vital in impressing your guests, but more importantly, it will set the tone that you want for your big day so that they can dress accordingly for the event. After all, you don’t want your friends to wear to the nines for a beach wedding, or show up in flip-flops for your elegant, black-tie banquet.


If you are using an instead brilliant color for your motif, like turquoise, decide for a fragile bow trim or small accents at the corners or sides instead than using it to the whole invitation. It's a wedding, not a night dancing at a trendy club.
The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.

If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.

If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."
Destination weddings to Hawaii, the Bahamas, the Virgin Islands, Maui, Jamaica and even more are becoming more and more prominent as destination wedding event planning online has actually come to be much easier as well as easier. The coastline is one of the most prominent destination wedding event style nowadays and several bride-to-bes intend to begin their wedding theme off right with an attractive coastline theme wedding event invite.
Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
Your wedding should be one of the most memorable things to happen in your life, but there are some things that you have to sort out along the way. Whether you are forced to invite people you barely know to appease your parents or feel compelled to ask your boss on the day you say “I do”. you know that no matter how grand or low-key you want the day to be, you need to impress your family, friends, and guests of the effort you planned on your big day. First impressions, especially your wedding invitations, will set the tone of just how impressive your guests expect your wedding to be. Not only does the letter provide the essential details of your wedding, but it also sets the tone of the event.
Most couples choose to include a separate response card for guests to fill out and return in the mail. You also have the option of having people RSVP via your wedding website. If that's the case, include the website address on a separate card, just as you would with an RSVP card, and indicate that guests can let you know if they can come directly on the site.
“The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service. Some couples opt to spell "honour" using the British spelling; both are correct but spelling it with a "u" evokes a more formal and traditional feel. (Note: If you're using "honour" on the invitation, we recommend matching it with "favour" as in "favour of your reply" on the RSVP card.)
Traditionally, the bride's parents are the hosts of the wedding, and are named at the top of the invitation, even for very formal affairs. However, including the names of both sets of parents as hosts is a gracious option no matter who foots the bill. Also, more and more couples these days are hosting their own weddings, or do so together with their parents.
If your wedding is going to be decorated with bows, small or large, try using them in the wedding invitations as well. You will be able to create a greater effect, especially if your guests discover that the bows were not only included in the invitations but also used as a form of decoration at the wedding itself. They’re really easy to make and are guaranteed to lend your elegant wedding invitations a charming appearance.
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