Very formal invitations include this information on a separate card. Otherwise, it can be printed on the wedding invitation itself if there is room; if the ceremony and reception are held in the same location, you may print "and afterward at the reception" or "reception immediately following." When the reception is elsewhere, the location goes on a different line.
The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.
The request line is where you invite people to attend your wedding (a.k.a. "Please come!"), so use this section to set the tone for your celebration. If your wedding is formal, use more formal language to reflect the occasion (e.g., "request the honor of your presence…"); if your wedding is casual, use less formal language (e.g., "Would love for you to join them..." or "Want you to come party with us…"). Here are a few more things to keep in mind:
The Invitation Line: This is where you actually invite people. “The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service while “The pleasure of your company” is used to denote a secular one, though you can use any phrasing you want. This is where you actually ask people to join you, so feel free to set the tone with anything from “Invite you to share their joy as…” to “Want you to come party with us when…”
Wedding invitation etiquette dictates that the dress code, if it's to be included on the invitation, is is the lower right hand corner of the invitation. If you don't include a note on attire, the invitation will indicate the dress code. For example, if the invitation is very fancy, guests will likely anticipating a formal, black-tie affair, or conversely, if the invitation on the simpler side, that indicates a more casual dress code.
The first line of the invitation is dedicated to the host of the wedding, also known as the party covering the expenses. Traditionally, the bride’s parents paid for the wedding but with changing times, the groom’s parents, bride and groom, or a combination of all three are contributing. There is no official order or requirement to list the names. It’s all up to personal preference.
The first line of the invitation is dedicated to the host of the wedding, also known as the party covering the expenses. Traditionally, the bride’s parents paid for the wedding but with changing times, the groom’s parents, bride and groom, or a combination of all three are contributing. There is no official order or requirement to list the names. It’s all up to personal preference.
Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.

If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.
Invitations usually give us a peep into what the wedding’s theme and decor will look like. A simple white, sprayed with a bit of beige or pale champagne pink will go well with any other colour. It’s a real classic with an essence of elegance, and it also matches any sort of decoration. This is just one of many gorgeous DIY wedding invitation cards.
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