For different-sex couples, the bride’s name typically goes first, followed by the groom's name. If the bride’s parents’ names are listed at the top, the bride’s name can just be her first and middle name (without last name), while the groom’s name is listed in full, or his first and middle names are listed, followed by the line “Son of Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Wong.”
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.

The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."
We understand that your Wedding Invitation is one of the most significant keepsakes of your lifetime. Our collection offers styles and DIY designs to give every couple an invitation to love forever. From classic to casual, traditional to modern, add your custom details in beautiful fonts and colors. For an extra personal touch, choose an invitation that includes your uploaded photos, featured or overlaid with text. Create your own wedding monogram and add it to your invitation design to make it extra special.
When unsure about a tricky situation, do what really feels right for you. A great deal of the moment, you can compose and also revise the phrasing to consist of everybody and also still please you. Review your words aloud-- a lot of times you can see what something seems like to a reader, and afterwards evaluate your option from there.
Wedding invitations, in particular, indicate how the event should appear, and also show what the bride and groom expect from their guests as well. Thanks to technology, there are numerous ways to send out wedding invitations -- even to your loved ones halfway across the globe. Paper invitations that your guests receive in the mail add a certain charm and elegance to the event, and will make people feel special due to its nature. On the other hand, email and social media make updating that much easier, because everything gets done in real-time, so you know how many people to expect, and your guests could get updates from your end as quickly, too.
Sometimes less is more. For couples that want to keep simple wedding invitation wording to a minimum, this style is for you. Perhaps you want to be a little mysterious with the details, or maybe you just want to keep things short and sweet because you’re sending your wedding invites out to hundreds of people. Either way, this wedding invitation wording style allows you to play around with fonts and colors.
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
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