Well, to a specific extent, you can not. There's only so much area on an invite to include everybody in your life, however, for those that you must, there are means to take care of the action and passed on parents in an invitation.

If the bride or groom's parents are divorced and you want to include both as hosts, you can include them all, just keep your each parent on a separate line. If you're going to include the name of stepparent, keep it on the same line. It might seem complex at first, but all it requires is a few more lines. This is an example of a bride with divorced (and remarried) parents' wedding invitation wording:
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.

You can include another small insert revealing your new address if you are moving to a brand-new home after the wedding.

If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."
The wording on your invitation should correspond with the formality and style of your wedding. From formal to casual, the wording should reflect the formality and tone you’d like to set. Every wedding invitation should include these elements: host{s}, couple getting married, time, date and location. Be inspired! Choose wording that complements your situation, style, and spirit of your wedding.
One of the most essential things, that an invitation needs to contain, is the location and the precise date and time of the wedding. If you want your guests to save the date automatically, you can place a calendar on the invitation and mark the big day with a heart. It will be easy to spot and it will be easy to memorise. You can see a great example of this idea in the picture above. Calendar cards are great handmade wedding invitations.
Wedding event invites are an integral part of a wedding event's style as well as the "state of mind" you want to set for your ceremony. Besides, if the function were to exclusively notify the guests of the details of the occasion, after that you could simply send out an e-mail or postcard.
The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster), they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express anything from your values to the kind of wedding you’re going to have to your artistic taste. But wedding invitation wording still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)
There you have it: Everything you need to know about wedding invitation wording etiquette, complete with twenty-two example of how brides handled their own wording. Hopefully these real invites will help guide you as you create your own. No matter what you choose, keep it true to your own tastes and you'll come up with a wedding invitation you'll treasure forever!
The good news is that wedding invitation etiquette rules aren't that complicated, after all. The rules are actually much simpler and straightforward than you think. And no matter the case, they're there to serve as a guidelines. The most important rule of all is that you create a beautiful wedding invitation that represents you, your love and the big day to come (and communicates the vital details of the wedding) – so feel absolutely free to riff off these wedding invitation wording rules to create your own.
Emails, Texts, or good old fashioned snail mail, make sure to consider all of the pros and cons. Some methods are faster, more convenient, and easier to make changes to if the need arises. Setting up a Facebook page and event, for example, is a really quick and easy way to spread the word and keep track of your RSVPs. But, some of your guests may not be too tech savvy or check their inbox very often.
Traditional wedding invitation wording has spent decades slowly evolving into what we see today. The past few decades, however, have been the most drastic. Not to worry. traditional wording for wedding invites can be easily adapted to work for our modern families including divorced parents, single parents, multiple sets of parents, and all of the other structures. This structured wedding invitation wording also works perfectly well for couples who are hosting their own celebration.
There are many variables that dictate the exact wedding invitation structure to follow. The first we’re going to cover is your style and theme. Before you get started with your invitations you’ll have to make sure that you’ve firmly decided between a Traditional, Formal, Informal, or completely unique theme so that you can send specific, for example, rustic wedding invitations if that happens to be your theme of choice.
Wedding event invites are an integral part of a wedding event's style as well as the "state of mind" you want to set for your ceremony. Besides, if the function were to exclusively notify the guests of the details of the occasion, after that you could simply send out an e-mail or postcard.
If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.
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