The request line is where you invite people to attend your wedding (a.k.a. "Please come!"), so use this section to set the tone for your celebration. If your wedding is formal, use more formal language to reflect the occasion (e.g., "request the honor of your presence…"); if your wedding is casual, use less formal language (e.g., "Would love for you to join them..." or "Want you to come party with us…"). Here are a few more things to keep in mind:
If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."
Most couples really feel as though they are no various from their organic moms and dads when it comes to tip moms and dads. So, they wish to integrate them into the invitation too. And also while traditionally, the parents are consisted of, how do you place in everybody's name?
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
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