Sending out your wedding invitations is an exciting step in the wedding planning process! If addressing all of your invites is a daunting process to you, recipient addressing is the answer to your prayers. Don’t forget to include RSVP cards and to take advantage of RSVP functions on your wedding website in case any RSVPs get lost in the mail. Remember to hold on to a couple of invitations — they are perfect for scrapbooking, crafting and including in a shadow box or photo book! After the wedding, make sure to send your attendees thank you cards to show them how much you value their love and support.

Well, to a specific extent, you can not. There's only so much area on an invite to include everybody in your life, however, for those that you must, there are means to take care of the action and passed on parents in an invitation.


The wedding invitation will be the first time that many of your guests discover that you are getting married, so you’d better get it right! Proper wedding invitation wording may seem like a no-brainer at first glance but you’d be surprised at the amount of etiquette and formality that go into these short notes, and that’s what we’re here for. With our help, you’ll learn all about appropriate wedding invitation format and make sure that you hit all of the nuances that some couples overlook.

Casual wedding invitation wording is the polar opposite of traditional invites. All of the usual information is still included, but we love the room for creativity this style provides, especially when it comes to humor. This style of wedding invitation wording also leaves plenty of room for poetry and quotes, and to go crazy with elaborate descriptions of the upcoming event.


If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."


The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
Host Line: This line is dedicated to honoring the host. This is typically the Bride’s parents and should begin with the father and then the mother. This is the formal way to write it, but with today’s etiquette, it’s very much appreciated to include both sets of parents. If you are paying and hosting the wedding yourself, place your own names starting with the groom. 
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