Wedding invitations play a huge role in giving guests their first impression of the soon-to-be-married couple as well as what the wedding will be like. With this wedding invitation idea, you can literally smuggle yourself into the card by putting in a few adorable or funny pictures of you and your fiancée. A photo series is a great idea because you already present your guests with a bubbly and loving vibe. These are sure to put a smile on your guests’ faces when they open your handmade wedding invitations!
The wording on your invitation should correspond with the formality and style of your wedding. From formal to casual, the wording should reflect the formality and tone you’d like to set. Every wedding invitation should include these elements: host{s}, couple getting married, time, date and location. Be inspired! Choose wording that complements your situation, style, and spirit of your wedding.

Nevertheless, the invitation also acts as a keepsake of a special celebration, as well as a news of a couple's love. Like the wedding itself, it has to be beautiful and also personal.
The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.

Create your own wedding color theme. With the capability to revise each section on the invite to one of over 160 colors you have the capability to put together a color theme that is truly distinct. Don't settle for an online invite company that limits you to three or four predefined color schemes. Expect more and build your own distinct wedding color theme with Basic Invite where your color preferences are unlimited.
Not sure where to begin with your wedding planning? Take our Style Quiz and we'll pull together a custom wedding vision and vendors to match, just for you. After that, create a free, personalized wedding website to keep your guests informed (and excited!) about your plans, and a time-saving Guest List Manager to organize your attendees. Even better? You can sync your Guest List Manager and wedding website to update everything at once. 
Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
Your wedding should be one of the most memorable things to happen in your life, but there are some things that you have to sort out along the way. Whether you are forced to invite people you barely know to appease your parents or feel compelled to ask your boss on the day you say “I do”. you know that no matter how grand or low-key you want the day to be, you need to impress your family, friends, and guests of the effort you planned on your big day. First impressions, especially your wedding invitations, will set the tone of just how impressive your guests expect your wedding to be. Not only does the letter provide the essential details of your wedding, but it also sets the tone of the event.
There you have it: Everything you need to know about wedding invitation wording etiquette, complete with twenty-two example of how brides handled their own wording. Hopefully these real invites will help guide you as you create your own. No matter what you choose, keep it true to your own tastes and you'll come up with a wedding invitation you'll treasure forever!
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
Now that you have the basics covered, it’s time to get specific. The first question is; who’s name goes first, the bride or the groom? Traditionally, whoever is hosting the wedding will get first billing. This is usually the Bride’s parents, making the Bride’s name the appropriate choice. In cases where there are co-hosts or two brides, the couple will have to decide for themselves. If you’re having difficulty, say the names out loud and see if any option has a better ring to it.

If somebody has actually recently died, then you might intend to consist of that as a separate note as a method to let your guests recognize and also avoid any awkward minutes. If it was a current event, this is particularly real.
One of the most essential things, that an invitation needs to contain, is the location and the precise date and time of the wedding. If you want your guests to save the date automatically, you can place a calendar on the invitation and mark the big day with a heart. It will be easy to spot and it will be easy to memorise. You can see a great example of this idea in the picture above. Calendar cards are great handmade wedding invitations.
In this case, the invitation includes the bride's parents’ names, so you can omit the bride's last name (unless she has a different last name than her parents). On the following line, write out the groom’s entire name. LGBTQ+ wedding invitation wording should follow similar guidelines. The host of the celebration (read: the party footing the bill) is listed first, followed by their son or daughter’s name, followed by their son or daughter’s partner’s name. If the couple is hosting themselves, names are typically listed in alphabetical order.
The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
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