If among the couple members wish to include their moms and dad that has actually passed on, they can claim something to the effect of 'boy of Mr. Smith and also the late Mrs. Smith.' That functions simply fine. If both parents are deceased, you may want to keep in mind that as 'boy of the late Mr. and Mrs.'
If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."
Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
Very formal invitations include this information on a separate card. Otherwise, it can be printed on the wedding invitation itself if there is room; if the ceremony and reception are held in the same location, you may print "and afterward at the reception" or "reception immediately following." When the reception is elsewhere, the location goes on a different line.

“The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service. Some couples opt to spell "honour" using the British spelling; both are correct but spelling it with a "u" evokes a more formal and traditional feel. (Note: If you're using "honour" on the invitation, we recommend matching it with "favour" as in "favour of your reply" on the RSVP card.)
When guests open their wedding invitation, the first thing they see is your overall design. Your design should reflect the personal style of your wedding. There are many invitation styles to choose from — ornate, minimalist, rustic, vintage, artistic, whimsical, classic or modern. Consider including some of these additional design elements in your wedding invitation:
The wording on your invitation should correspond with the formality and style of your wedding. From formal to casual, the wording should reflect the formality and tone you’d like to set. Every wedding invitation should include these elements: host{s}, couple getting married, time, date and location. Be inspired! Choose wording that complements your situation, style, and spirit of your wedding.
There are many variables that dictate the exact wedding invitation structure to follow. The first we’re going to cover is your style and theme. Before you get started with your invitations you’ll have to make sure that you’ve firmly decided between a Traditional, Formal, Informal, or completely unique theme so that you can send specific, for example, rustic wedding invitations if that happens to be your theme of choice.

If your wedding is going to be decorated with bows, small or large, try using them in the wedding invitations as well. You will be able to create a greater effect, especially if your guests discover that the bows were not only included in the invitations but also used as a form of decoration at the wedding itself. They’re really easy to make and are guaranteed to lend your elegant wedding invitations a charming appearance.
Not sure where to begin with your wedding planning? Take our Style Quiz and we'll pull together a custom wedding vision and vendors to match, just for you. After that, create a free, personalized wedding website to keep your guests informed (and excited!) about your plans, and a time-saving Guest List Manager to organize your attendees. Even better? You can sync your Guest List Manager and wedding website to update everything at once. 
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