If the bride or groom's parents are divorced and you want to include both as hosts, you can include them all, just keep your each parent on a separate line. If you're going to include the name of stepparent, keep it on the same line. It might seem complex at first, but all it requires is a few more lines. This is an example of a bride with divorced (and remarried) parents' wedding invitation wording:
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
Every bride desires her wedding to be special as well as her wedding celebration invite is no different. Finding the ideal coastline wedding event invite wording is as important as discovering the excellent coastline wedding event invitation itself, so below are 5 beach wedding invite wording tips.
Sometimes less is more. For couples that want to keep simple wedding invitation wording to a minimum, this style is for you. Perhaps you want to be a little mysterious with the details, or maybe you just want to keep things short and sweet because you’re sending your wedding invites out to hundreds of people. Either way, this wedding invitation wording style allows you to play around with fonts and colors.
If you are using an instead brilliant color for your motif, like turquoise, decide for a fragile bow trim or small accents at the corners or sides instead than using it to the whole invitation. It's a wedding, not a night dancing at a trendy club.
Not sure how to word your wedding invitations? It might seem simple at first, but once you get started, you may realize that crafting the perfect wedding invitation wording can be a little tricky—there are etiquette rules to navigate and maybe a couple of sticky situations to figure out. But in a nutshell, the wording of your invitation should reflect the overall vibe of your wedding day. Ready to get started? We've compiled this guide to wedding invitation wording and etiquette right here.

It all starts with the right design. Once you have found the right template you have the ability of making it unique by modifying each section on the design to one of over 160 distinct colors for a look that is uniquely you. After color preferences, select from a selection of premium paper types to make sure you get the paper type that suites your style and look flawlessly. If that was not enough, Basic Invite provides over 40 distinct envelope colors to establish the correct tone for your vintage invites leading up to them even being opened.

If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.
This next section of formal wedding invitation samples focuses on the groom’s parents hosting the event. You’ll see that it shares a lot of similarities with the previous samples, but also some clear differences. We’ll also take a look at how to word wedding invites for when both sets of parents co-host, and when one set hosts but want to show respect to the other parents.
Sending out your wedding invitations is an exciting step in the wedding planning process! If addressing all of your invites is a daunting process to you, recipient addressing is the answer to your prayers. Don’t forget to include RSVP cards and to take advantage of RSVP functions on your wedding website in case any RSVPs get lost in the mail. Remember to hold on to a couple of invitations — they are perfect for scrapbooking, crafting and including in a shadow box or photo book! After the wedding, make sure to send your attendees thank you cards to show them how much you value their love and support.
The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."
The Host Line: The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding. In times past, the bride’s family always hosted (and paid for) the wedding. Thankfully, those days are done. Hosting the wedding is, in the end, a (mostly meaningless) honor that you get to choose how to pass out. Both (or all) your sets/singles of parents can be listed as hosts. If you have five sets of parents and you want to list them all—go for it. One set of parents might be listed as hosts. You can host the wedding yourself, in which case the lines are reversed “Terry and Renee invite you to…” or the host line is omitted entirely. You can also make the host line more general “Together with their families.” There are two issues worth noting here. Firstly, no matter who says what in the course of guilting you, the host line on the wedding invitation isn’t for sale; it’s an honor that you should bestow in a way that makes you feel comfortable. Names are not listed in order of who paid more (or who paid at all). And secondly, this particular honor is generally only used for the living (since these people are, ostensibly, inviting you to a party). A common way to honor the dead is to alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Renee Smith, daughter of Beth Smith,” or “Renee Smith, daughter of Iris Milfrid and the late Beth Smith.”
Invitations usually give us a peep into what the wedding’s theme and decor will look like. A simple white, sprayed with a bit of beige or pale champagne pink will go well with any other colour. It’s a real classic with an essence of elegance, and it also matches any sort of decoration. This is just one of many gorgeous DIY wedding invitation cards.
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