If the bride or groom's parents are divorced and you want to include both as hosts, you can include them all, just keep your each parent on a separate line. If you're going to include the name of stepparent, keep it on the same line. It might seem complex at first, but all it requires is a few more lines. This is an example of a bride with divorced (and remarried) parents' wedding invitation wording:


If there is a parent that has been absent for the child's life, after that they do not need to be taken into the invitation.
If you are using an instead brilliant color for your motif, like turquoise, decide for a fragile bow trim or small accents at the corners or sides instead than using it to the whole invitation. It's a wedding, not a night dancing at a trendy club.
In this case, the invitation includes the bride's parents’ names, so you can omit the bride's last name (unless she has a different last name than her parents). On the following line, write out the groom’s entire name. LGBTQ+ wedding invitation wording should follow similar guidelines. The host of the celebration (read: the party footing the bill) is listed first, followed by their son or daughter’s name, followed by their son or daughter’s partner’s name. If the couple is hosting themselves, names are typically listed in alphabetical order.
If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.
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