The M line: The “M” line on the RSVP card is the place where guests will write in their names. The "M" itself is meant to designate the first letter of the formal salutation (Mr., Mrs., Miss or Ms.), which the guest would write along with their name(s). The most traditional weddings might use the “M” line; for less formal celebrations, we suggest the more straightforward “Name(s)” instead.
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.

Coastline expressions-- Discover a solitary beach expression that fits you and your partner however likewise suits the beach setup you will certainly be married in. "In the past on a coastline ..." or "What takes place on the coastline ... stays in our hearts," are simply some instances. A lot more instances can be discovered at BeachWedlockInvitations.com.
Dress code: Including a line about the wedding's dress code is optional but can be helpful for guests; however, if your wedding is black tie, you must include that on the invitation. If you don't include dress code information on the invitation, then guests will infer attire details based on the formality of the wedding invitation itself (i.e., if the invitation is very fancy, guests will likely anticipate a formal affair). The dress code line should be listed on a line following the reception location.
In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster), they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express anything from your values to the kind of wedding you’re going to have to your artistic taste. But wedding invitation wording still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)
If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.
Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.
If among the couple members wish to include their moms and dad that has actually passed on, they can claim something to the effect of 'boy of Mr. Smith and also the late Mrs. Smith.' That functions simply fine. If both parents are deceased, you may want to keep in mind that as 'boy of the late Mr. and Mrs.'
If the bride or groom's parents are divorced and you want to include both as hosts, you can include them all, just keep your each parent on a separate line. If you're going to include the name of stepparent, keep it on the same line. It might seem complex at first, but all it requires is a few more lines. This is an example of a bride with divorced (and remarried) parents' wedding invitation wording:
If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."

There are literally thousands of creative wedding invitation ideas. So we waded through them to bring you a small collection of creative designs that aren't just cute, they're also easy to make. To print your own, just download the template provided, add your wedding details and package it any way you like. Not sure exactly how to word them? Use our invitation wording tool.


The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
The request line is where you invite people to attend your wedding (a.k.a. "Please come!"), so use this section to set the tone for your celebration. If your wedding is formal, use more formal language to reflect the occasion (e.g., "request the honor of your presence…"); if your wedding is casual, use less formal language (e.g., "Would love for you to join them..." or "Want you to come party with us…"). Here are a few more things to keep in mind:
Sometimes less is more. For couples that want to keep simple wedding invitation wording to a minimum, this style is for you. Perhaps you want to be a little mysterious with the details, or maybe you just want to keep things short and sweet because you’re sending your wedding invites out to hundreds of people. Either way, this wedding invitation wording style allows you to play around with fonts and colors.

For different-sex couples, the bride’s name typically goes first, followed by the groom's name. If the bride’s parents’ names are listed at the top, the bride’s name can just be her first and middle name (without last name), while the groom’s name is listed in full, or his first and middle names are listed, followed by the line “Son of Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Wong.”
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
If somebody has actually recently died, then you might intend to consist of that as a separate note as a method to let your guests recognize and also avoid any awkward minutes. If it was a current event, this is particularly real.

The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.
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There is no incorrect phrasing-- Certain wedding celebration invite phrasing principles exist, however many people do not know them and wouldn't discover if you went according to the regulations or not. Besides, more and more bridegrooms and also bride-to-bes are tossing the rules to the wind nowadays and simply composing what they want. Don't stress over attempting to comply with all the guidelines. The reason you're most likely having a coastline wedding is since you really did not want the typical wedding ceremony anyhow, so have your coastline wedding celebration invitation reflect the exact same cost-free moving spirit that the beach has.
Nevertheless, the invitation also acts as a keepsake of a special celebration, as well as a news of a couple's love. Like the wedding itself, it has to be beautiful and also personal.

Wondering how to word your invitations? You can request free wedding catalogs, wedding invitation samples, and look online for more examples and inspiration. Another helpful way of keeping guests updated on details is a wedding website, as these can often fit more information and show more of your personalities on top of your invitations and save the dates.
Not sure how to word your wedding invitations? It might seem simple at first, but once you get started, you may realize that crafting the perfect wedding invitation wording can be a little tricky—there are etiquette rules to navigate and maybe a couple of sticky situations to figure out. But in a nutshell, the wording of your invitation should reflect the overall vibe of your wedding day. Ready to get started? We've compiled this guide to wedding invitation wording and etiquette right here.
When guests open their wedding invitation, the first thing they see is your overall design. Your design should reflect the personal style of your wedding. There are many invitation styles to choose from — ornate, minimalist, rustic, vintage, artistic, whimsical, classic or modern. Consider including some of these additional design elements in your wedding invitation:
If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."

Dress code: Including a line about the wedding's dress code is optional but can be helpful for guests; however, if your wedding is black tie, you must include that on the invitation. If you don't include dress code information on the invitation, then guests will infer attire details based on the formality of the wedding invitation itself (i.e., if the invitation is very fancy, guests will likely anticipate a formal affair). The dress code line should be listed on a line following the reception location.


If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
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