From the internet to your best friend to your nearly-in-laws, wedding tips are superabundant. Craft a gracious but noncommittal response to suggestions, and offer it with a genuine smile. In an unpressured moment, choose the ideas that fit your vision and your budget, and be thankful so many people want your special day to be wonderful! For more ideas and tips, keep reading at our blog about wedding seasons ,  money saving tips on a wedding & wedding invitations design guide

The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.
Every couple is different, and although the differences between all of these wedding invitation wording styles are subtle, it’s important to say things in a way which reflects who you are and the type of wedding you want to have. Perfecting your wedding invite wording may have seemed complicated at first, but If you follow our guide and match it with your hopes, dreams, and theme you’ll have no trouble at all.
The request line is where you invite people to attend your wedding (a.k.a. "Please come!"), so use this section to set the tone for your celebration. If your wedding is formal, use more formal language to reflect the occasion (e.g., "request the honor of your presence…"); if your wedding is casual, use less formal language (e.g., "Would love for you to join them..." or "Want you to come party with us…"). Here are a few more things to keep in mind:
A wedding invitation card is a humble and polite request letter to ask the recipients to attend the event and bless the bride and groom. This letter often follows a formal and third-person narrative. It is circulated to people at least a week before the marriage date. Since it is a big day in everyone's life, we understand why you would like to make everything special about it. Thus we have prepared several unique invitation templates to fit into your definition of wedding party invitations.
The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."

If the bride or groom's parents are divorced and you want to include both as hosts, you can include them all, just keep your each parent on a separate line. If you're going to include the name of stepparent, keep it on the same line. It might seem complex at first, but all it requires is a few more lines. This is an example of a bride with divorced (and remarried) parents' wedding invitation wording:
It all starts with the right design. Once you have found the right template you have the ability of making it unique by modifying each section on the design to one of over 160 distinct colors for a look that is uniquely you. After color preferences, select from a selection of premium paper types to make sure you get the paper type that suites your style and look flawlessly. If that was not enough, Basic Invite provides over 40 distinct envelope colors to establish the correct tone for your vintage invites leading up to them even being opened.
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