If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.

Your (amazing!) invitations should arrive in mailboxes six to eight weeks before your wedding, again allowing extra if guests will need to arrange time off and air travel. Set your RSVP date three to four weeks prior to your wedding so you’ll have time to follow up on missing responses before you have to give final numbers to your vendors. A great tip is to use an invisible ink UV pen to mark your response cards with numbers corresponding to your guest list. It’s common to receive back several RSVP’s with no name, and the number system allows you to identify the responders. The UV part keeps it all discreet and the envelope pristine.


As mentioned before, a laser cut envelope is a beautiful and elegant way to send out invitations. Another great mode of using the laser cut technique is by using it on the invitation cards. It will look fabulous when opening the card. The front page of the invitation can be cut out with the laser technique, while the inside of the card can contain the details of the wedding. If you would like to make it even more gorgeous, you can tie a slip of paper around it, which has the initials of the betrothed couple written on it.

Host Line: This line is dedicated to honoring the host. This is typically the Bride’s parents and should begin with the father and then the mother. This is the formal way to write it, but with today’s etiquette, it’s very much appreciated to include both sets of parents. If you are paying and hosting the wedding yourself, place your own names starting with the groom.

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