If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.
Create your own wedding color theme. With the capability to revise each section on the invite to one of over 160 colors you have the capability to put together a color theme that is truly distinct. Don't settle for an online invite company that limits you to three or four predefined color schemes. Expect more and build your own distinct wedding color theme with Basic Invite where your color preferences are unlimited.
If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."
Now that you have the basics covered, it’s time to get specific. The first question is; who’s name goes first, the bride or the groom? Traditionally, whoever is hosting the wedding will get first billing. This is usually the Bride’s parents, making the Bride’s name the appropriate choice. In cases where there are co-hosts or two brides, the couple will have to decide for themselves. If you’re having difficulty, say the names out loud and see if any option has a better ring to it.
For different-sex couples, the bride’s name typically goes first, followed by the groom's name. If the bride’s parents’ names are listed at the top, the bride’s name can just be her first and middle name (without last name), while the groom’s name is listed in full, or his first and middle names are listed, followed by the line “Son of Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Wong.”
Host Line: This line is dedicated to honoring the host. This is typically the Bride’s parents and should begin with the father and then the mother. This is the formal way to write it, but with today’s etiquette, it’s very much appreciated to include both sets of parents. If you are paying and hosting the wedding yourself, place your own names starting with the groom.
If you’re looking for something more modern and more unique, then you will certainly love this idea. It’s creative and fun. Take out two pieces of the puzzle, placing them together, representing the union of the bride and groom. On the part of the wedding invitation, where the puzzle pieces were taken out, write down the happy couples’ names. We recommend these funny wedding invitations for couples who are up for a bit of fun and are young at heart.
The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
A wedding invitation card is a humble and polite request letter to ask the recipients to attend the event and bless the bride and groom. This letter often follows a formal and third-person narrative. It is circulated to people at least a week before the marriage date. Since it is a big day in everyone's life, we understand why you would like to make everything special about it. Thus we have prepared several unique invitation templates to fit into your definition of wedding party invitations.
Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.
If you are using an instead brilliant color for your motif, like turquoise, decide for a fragile bow trim or small accents at the corners or sides instead than using it to the whole invitation. It's a wedding, not a night dancing at a trendy club.
The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."

The Invitation Line: This is where you actually invite people. “The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service while “The pleasure of your company” is used to denote a secular one, though you can use any phrasing you want. This is where you actually ask people to join you, so feel free to set the tone with anything from “Invite you to share their joy as…” to “Want you to come party with us when…”
The request line is where you invite people to attend your wedding (a.k.a. "Please come!"), so use this section to set the tone for your celebration. If your wedding is formal, use more formal language to reflect the occasion (e.g., "request the honor of your presence…"); if your wedding is casual, use less formal language (e.g., "Would love for you to join them..." or "Want you to come party with us…"). Here are a few more things to keep in mind:

Wondering how to word your invitations? You can request free wedding catalogs, wedding invitation samples, and look online for more examples and inspiration. Another helpful way of keeping guests updated on details is a wedding website, as these can often fit more information and show more of your personalities on top of your invitations and save the dates.
If your wedding is going to be decorated with bows, small or large, try using them in the wedding invitations as well. You will be able to create a greater effect, especially if your guests discover that the bows were not only included in the invitations but also used as a form of decoration at the wedding itself. They’re really easy to make and are guaranteed to lend your elegant wedding invitations a charming appearance.
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