The Invitation Line: This is where you actually invite people. “The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service while “The pleasure of your company” is used to denote a secular one, though you can use any phrasing you want. This is where you actually ask people to join you, so feel free to set the tone with anything from “Invite you to share their joy as…” to “Want you to come party with us when…”
If somebody has actually recently died, then you might intend to consist of that as a separate note as a method to let your guests recognize and also avoid any awkward minutes. If it was a current event, this is particularly real.
The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."
It might seem awkward, yet it can be done. Other couples have chosen to simply consist of the names of their biological parents, referencing their existing last names. That works just.

If there is a parent that has been absent for the child's life, after that they do not need to be taken into the invitation.
Dress code: Including a line about the wedding's dress code is optional but can be helpful for guests; however, if your wedding is black tie, you must include that on the invitation. If you don't include dress code information on the invitation, then guests will infer attire details based on the formality of the wedding invitation itself (i.e., if the invitation is very fancy, guests will likely anticipate a formal affair). The dress code line should be listed on a line following the reception location.

Most couples choose to include a separate response card for guests to fill out and return in the mail. You also have the option of having people RSVP via your wedding website. If that's the case, include the website address on a separate card, just as you would with an RSVP card, and indicate that guests can let you know if they can come directly on the site.

Wedding event invites are an integral part of a wedding event's style as well as the "state of mind" you want to set for your ceremony. Besides, if the function were to exclusively notify the guests of the details of the occasion, after that you could simply send out an e-mail or postcard.
In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster), they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express anything from your values to the kind of wedding you’re going to have to your artistic taste. But wedding invitation wording still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)
Host Line: This line is dedicated to honoring the host. This is typically the Bride’s parents and should begin with the father and then the mother. This is the formal way to write it, but with today’s etiquette, it’s very much appreciated to include both sets of parents. If you are paying and hosting the wedding yourself, place your own names starting with the groom.
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