Whichever kind of wedding invitation to go with, they should have an eye-catching design or creative invitation. It would help grab your guests’ attention, at the same time, maintain the theme and overall aesthetics that you want your wedding to have. Crafting the perfect invitation is vital in impressing your guests, but more importantly, it will set the tone that you want for your big day so that they can dress accordingly for the event. After all, you don’t want your friends to wear to the nines for a beach wedding, or show up in flip-flops for your elegant, black-tie banquet.
Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
The good news is that wedding invitation etiquette rules aren't that complicated, after all. The rules are actually much simpler and straightforward than you think. And no matter the case, they're there to serve as a guidelines. The most important rule of all is that you create a beautiful wedding invitation that represents you, your love and the big day to come (and communicates the vital details of the wedding) – so feel absolutely free to riff off these wedding invitation wording rules to create your own.

Nevertheless, the invitation also acts as a keepsake of a special celebration, as well as a news of a couple's love. Like the wedding itself, it has to be beautiful and also personal.


Wedding Information: This is arguably the most critical section of the wedding invitation. It tells your guests where the event will take place and exactly when to arrive. To satisfy tradition, write the dates out in full instead of using numbers. This looks a lot fancier and avoids any possible misunderstandings. “The Fifth of April, Two Thousand and Eighteen” is crystal clear. Depending on how you read it, 04/05/18 Could be May 4th or April 5th which would be a terrible mistake.
If there is a parent that has been absent for the child's life, after that they do not need to be taken into the invitation.
The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
There are some families that might have different members in them, some that wedding event publications as well as etiquette overviews are struggling to stay on top of. Exactly how can you consist of every person as if all are equally essential?
The Host Line: The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding. In times past, the bride’s family always hosted (and paid for) the wedding. Thankfully, those days are done. Hosting the wedding is, in the end, a (mostly meaningless) honor that you get to choose how to pass out. Both (or all) your sets/singles of parents can be listed as hosts. If you have five sets of parents and you want to list them all—go for it. One set of parents might be listed as hosts. You can host the wedding yourself, in which case the lines are reversed “Terry and Renee invite you to…” or the host line is omitted entirely. You can also make the host line more general “Together with their families.” There are two issues worth noting here. Firstly, no matter who says what in the course of guilting you, the host line on the wedding invitation isn’t for sale; it’s an honor that you should bestow in a way that makes you feel comfortable. Names are not listed in order of who paid more (or who paid at all). And secondly, this particular honor is generally only used for the living (since these people are, ostensibly, inviting you to a party). A common way to honor the dead is to alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Renee Smith, daughter of Beth Smith,” or “Renee Smith, daughter of Iris Milfrid and the late Beth Smith.”

In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster), they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express anything from your values to the kind of wedding you’re going to have to your artistic taste. But wedding invitation wording still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)
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