Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
There you have it: Everything you need to know about wedding invitation wording etiquette, complete with twenty-two example of how brides handled their own wording. Hopefully these real invites will help guide you as you create your own. No matter what you choose, keep it true to your own tastes and you'll come up with a wedding invitation you'll treasure forever!
If you’re planning on hosting your wedding overseas, then check out this super creative and original passport invitation! It looks exactly like a passport, but instead of containing personal details it includes the most important information, that your guests need to know about your wedding. For example the date and location. This is one of many great DIY wedding invitation cards.
If somebody has actually recently died, then you might intend to consist of that as a separate note as a method to let your guests recognize and also avoid any awkward minutes. If it was a current event, this is particularly real.
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
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