Whichever kind of wedding invitation to go with, they should have an eye-catching design or creative invitation. It would help grab your guests’ attention, at the same time, maintain the theme and overall aesthetics that you want your wedding to have. Crafting the perfect invitation is vital in impressing your guests, but more importantly, it will set the tone that you want for your big day so that they can dress accordingly for the event. After all, you don’t want your friends to wear to the nines for a beach wedding, or show up in flip-flops for your elegant, black-tie banquet.
If among the couple members wish to include their moms and dad that has actually passed on, they can claim something to the effect of 'boy of Mr. Smith and also the late Mrs. Smith.' That functions simply fine. If both parents are deceased, you may want to keep in mind that as 'boy of the late Mr. and Mrs.'
The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.
In this case, the invitation includes the bride's parents’ names, so you can omit the bride's last name (unless she has a different last name than her parents). On the following line, write out the groom’s entire name. LGBTQ+ wedding invitation wording should follow similar guidelines. The host of the celebration (read: the party footing the bill) is listed first, followed by their son or daughter’s name, followed by their son or daughter’s partner’s name. If the couple is hosting themselves, names are typically listed in alphabetical order.
Sometimes less is more. For couples that want to keep simple wedding invitation wording to a minimum, this style is for you. Perhaps you want to be a little mysterious with the details, or maybe you just want to keep things short and sweet because you’re sending your wedding invites out to hundreds of people. Either way, this wedding invitation wording style allows you to play around with fonts and colors.
Traditionally, the bride's parents are the hosts of the wedding, and are named at the top of the invitation, even for very formal affairs. However, including the names of both sets of parents as hosts is a gracious option no matter who foots the bill. Also, more and more couples these days are hosting their own weddings, or do so together with their parents.

Your (amazing!) invitations should arrive in mailboxes six to eight weeks before your wedding, again allowing extra if guests will need to arrange time off and air travel. Set your RSVP date three to four weeks prior to your wedding so you’ll have time to follow up on missing responses before you have to give final numbers to your vendors. A great tip is to use an invisible ink UV pen to mark your response cards with numbers corresponding to your guest list. It’s common to receive back several RSVP’s with no name, and the number system allows you to identify the responders. The UV part keeps it all discreet and the envelope pristine.
The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."
Not sure where to begin with your wedding planning? Take our Style Quiz and we'll pull together a custom wedding vision and vendors to match, just for you. After that, create a free, personalized wedding website to keep your guests informed (and excited!) about your plans, and a time-saving Guest List Manager to organize your attendees. Even better? You can sync your Guest List Manager and wedding website to update everything at once. 
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