In this case, the invitation includes the bride's parents’ names, so you can omit the bride's last name (unless she has a different last name than her parents). On the following line, write out the groom’s entire name. LGBTQ+ wedding invitation wording should follow similar guidelines. The host of the celebration (read: the party footing the bill) is listed first, followed by their son or daughter’s name, followed by their son or daughter’s partner’s name. If the couple is hosting themselves, names are typically listed in alphabetical order.
“The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service. Some couples opt to spell "honour" using the British spelling; both are correct but spelling it with a "u" evokes a more formal and traditional feel. (Note: If you're using "honour" on the invitation, we recommend matching it with "favour" as in "favour of your reply" on the RSVP card.)
Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
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