A lot of wedding event invite companies can offer a selection of themes where you just need to fill out the details names, locations as well as days. However, many couples favor to make their very own, to make the invite less tight and also more personalized. If so, here are a couple of guidelines:
For more specifics, we’ve provided some wedding invitation wording samples that vary from classic to whimsical. Note: if you like any of the invitations featured in this post, you can get them from Zola’s brand new line of printed wedding invitations and save-the-dates (you may already know Zola for being one of the first truly modern online wedding registries and for their actually useful planning tools.) While they didn’t sponsor this post, we do get a small commission every time you sign up for their free planning tools or purchase your wedding invitations through them, which is how we’re able to provide this content to you for free. Plus they’re stylish and affordable and currently 30% off until the beginning of February when you use the code PAPER30, so win/win.
Your wedding should be one of the most memorable things to happen in your life, but there are some things that you have to sort out along the way. Whether you are forced to invite people you barely know to appease your parents or feel compelled to ask your boss on the day you say “I do”. you know that no matter how grand or low-key you want the day to be, you need to impress your family, friends, and guests of the effort you planned on your big day. First impressions, especially your wedding invitations, will set the tone of just how impressive your guests expect your wedding to be. Not only does the letter provide the essential details of your wedding, but it also sets the tone of the event.
Emails, Texts, or good old fashioned snail mail, make sure to consider all of the pros and cons. Some methods are faster, more convenient, and easier to make changes to if the need arises. Setting up a Facebook page and event, for example, is a really quick and easy way to spread the word and keep track of your RSVPs. But, some of your guests may not be too tech savvy or check their inbox very often.
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
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