The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.
The Host Line: The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding. In times past, the bride’s family always hosted (and paid for) the wedding. Thankfully, those days are done. Hosting the wedding is, in the end, a (mostly meaningless) honor that you get to choose how to pass out. Both (or all) your sets/singles of parents can be listed as hosts. If you have five sets of parents and you want to list them all—go for it. One set of parents might be listed as hosts. You can host the wedding yourself, in which case the lines are reversed “Terry and Renee invite you to…” or the host line is omitted entirely. You can also make the host line more general “Together with their families.” There are two issues worth noting here. Firstly, no matter who says what in the course of guilting you, the host line on the wedding invitation isn’t for sale; it’s an honor that you should bestow in a way that makes you feel comfortable. Names are not listed in order of who paid more (or who paid at all). And secondly, this particular honor is generally only used for the living (since these people are, ostensibly, inviting you to a party). A common way to honor the dead is to alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Renee Smith, daughter of Beth Smith,” or “Renee Smith, daughter of Iris Milfrid and the late Beth Smith.”
Host Line: This line is dedicated to honoring the host. This is typically the Bride’s parents and should begin with the father and then the mother. This is the formal way to write it, but with today’s etiquette, it’s very much appreciated to include both sets of parents. If you are paying and hosting the wedding yourself, place your own names starting with the groom.

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You can absolutely switch up your wedding invitation wording to include the name of a deceased loved. One tactful and meaningful way to do this is to change the format slightly to accommodate the word "late" in front of your family member’s name. (Beyond the invitation wording, you have plenty of ways to honor a deceased parent during your ceremony and reception.) It can look something like this.
It might seem awkward, yet it can be done. Other couples have chosen to simply consist of the names of their biological parents, referencing their existing last names. That works just.
Well, to a specific extent, you can not. There's only so much area on an invite to include everybody in your life, however, for those that you must, there are means to take care of the action and passed on parents in an invitation.

Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.
When unsure about a tricky situation, do what really feels right for you. A great deal of the moment, you can compose and also revise the phrasing to consist of everybody and also still please you. Review your words aloud-- a lot of times you can see what something seems like to a reader, and afterwards evaluate your option from there.
If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."
Most wedding invitations arrive in the post in a standard envelope. Here’s a great tip if you would like to send out invitations via post, but with a tiny twist. The colour of your envelope can match the wedding decor or the colour of the flowers used on the big day. You can also seal the envelope with a smaller wax seal, to make it elegant and extraordinary. A wax seal can also represent your celebration of love, especially if you press your and your significant other’s initials into it. These are beautiful DIY wedding invitation cards.
Traditional wedding invitation wording has spent decades slowly evolving into what we see today. The past few decades, however, have been the most drastic. Not to worry. traditional wording for wedding invites can be easily adapted to work for our modern families including divorced parents, single parents, multiple sets of parents, and all of the other structures. This structured wedding invitation wording also works perfectly well for couples who are hosting their own celebration.
Your (amazing!) invitations should arrive in mailboxes six to eight weeks before your wedding, again allowing extra if guests will need to arrange time off and air travel. Set your RSVP date three to four weeks prior to your wedding so you’ll have time to follow up on missing responses before you have to give final numbers to your vendors. A great tip is to use an invisible ink UV pen to mark your response cards with numbers corresponding to your guest list. It’s common to receive back several RSVP’s with no name, and the number system allows you to identify the responders. The UV part keeps it all discreet and the envelope pristine.
If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.
Your wedding invitations are the first impression guests will have of your celebration. They should convey the who, when and where of the event, while offering a sneak peek of your wedding aesthetic. Wedding invitations should spell out all essential wedding info—who's getting married, who's hosting, and where and when the ceremony and reception will take place. (Psst—everything else goes on your wedding website.) And while we’re about to get into the best wedding invitation wording samples, feel free to shake things up if your wedding style is more modern, relaxed or nontraditional. Here’s how to word your wedding invites, no matter the vibe.
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
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