Your (amazing!) invitations should arrive in mailboxes six to eight weeks before your wedding, again allowing extra if guests will need to arrange time off and air travel. Set your RSVP date three to four weeks prior to your wedding so you’ll have time to follow up on missing responses before you have to give final numbers to your vendors. A great tip is to use an invisible ink UV pen to mark your response cards with numbers corresponding to your guest list. It’s common to receive back several RSVP’s with no name, and the number system allows you to identify the responders. The UV part keeps it all discreet and the envelope pristine.

Now that you have the basics covered, it’s time to get specific. The first question is; who’s name goes first, the bride or the groom? Traditionally, whoever is hosting the wedding will get first billing. This is usually the Bride’s parents, making the Bride’s name the appropriate choice. In cases where there are co-hosts or two brides, the couple will have to decide for themselves. If you’re having difficulty, say the names out loud and see if any option has a better ring to it.
Wondering how to word your invitations? You can request free wedding catalogs, wedding invitation samples, and look online for more examples and inspiration. Another helpful way of keeping guests updated on details is a wedding website, as these can often fit more information and show more of your personalities on top of your invitations and save the dates.
The wording on your invitation should correspond with the formality and style of your wedding. From formal to casual, the wording should reflect the formality and tone you’d like to set. Every wedding invitation should include these elements: host{s}, couple getting married, time, date and location. Be inspired! Choose wording that complements your situation, style, and spirit of your wedding.
If the bride or groom's parents are divorced and you want to include both as hosts, you can include them all, just keep your each parent on a separate line. If you're going to include the name of stepparent, keep it on the same line. It might seem complex at first, but all it requires is a few more lines. This is an example of a bride with divorced (and remarried) parents' wedding invitation wording:
Invitations usually give us a peep into what the wedding’s theme and decor will look like. A simple white, sprayed with a bit of beige or pale champagne pink will go well with any other colour. It’s a real classic with an essence of elegance, and it also matches any sort of decoration. This is just one of many gorgeous DIY wedding invitation cards.
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