The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
This next section of formal wedding invitation samples focuses on the groom’s parents hosting the event. You’ll see that it shares a lot of similarities with the previous samples, but also some clear differences. We’ll also take a look at how to word wedding invites for when both sets of parents co-host, and when one set hosts but want to show respect to the other parents.
There you have it: Everything you need to know about wedding invitation wording etiquette, complete with twenty-two example of how brides handled their own wording. Hopefully these real invites will help guide you as you create your own. No matter what you choose, keep it true to your own tastes and you'll come up with a wedding invitation you'll treasure forever!

The M line: The “M” line on the RSVP card is the place where guests will write in their names. The "M" itself is meant to designate the first letter of the formal salutation (Mr., Mrs., Miss or Ms.), which the guest would write along with their name(s). The most traditional weddings might use the “M” line; for less formal celebrations, we suggest the more straightforward “Name(s)” instead.
When guests open their wedding invitation, the first thing they see is your overall design. Your design should reflect the personal style of your wedding. There are many invitation styles to choose from — ornate, minimalist, rustic, vintage, artistic, whimsical, classic or modern. Consider including some of these additional design elements in your wedding invitation:
Your (amazing!) invitations should arrive in mailboxes six to eight weeks before your wedding, again allowing extra if guests will need to arrange time off and air travel. Set your RSVP date three to four weeks prior to your wedding so you’ll have time to follow up on missing responses before you have to give final numbers to your vendors. A great tip is to use an invisible ink UV pen to mark your response cards with numbers corresponding to your guest list. It’s common to receive back several RSVP’s with no name, and the number system allows you to identify the responders. The UV part keeps it all discreet and the envelope pristine.
A lot of wedding event invite companies can offer a selection of themes where you just need to fill out the details names, locations as well as days. However, many couples favor to make their very own, to make the invite less tight and also more personalized. If so, here are a couple of guidelines:
Vintage chic weddings are becoming popular and are an elegant display of old world charm with a modern twist. Modern brides are putting emphasis on vintage design for their wedding ceremonies and all correspondences, including vintage wedding invitations. Elegantweddinginvites.com is providing vintage wedding invitations with high quality and affordable price. Our vintage designs wedding invites can add a touch of romance to your wedding celebration, such as the lace wedding invites, whether it be designs decorated with real lace or a printed pattern. They remind guests of a bygone eras, traditions and old fashion etiquette. Click any image and start to customize, and then you can seal and send out your vintage wedding invitations to set the right tone for your upcoming nuptial.
If you are using an instead brilliant color for your motif, like turquoise, decide for a fragile bow trim or small accents at the corners or sides instead than using it to the whole invitation. It's a wedding, not a night dancing at a trendy club.

If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
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