The Invitation Line: This is where you actually invite people. “The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service while “The pleasure of your company” is used to denote a secular one, though you can use any phrasing you want. This is where you actually ask people to join you, so feel free to set the tone with anything from “Invite you to share their joy as…” to “Want you to come party with us when…”
It all starts with the right design. Once you have found the right template you have the ability of making it unique by modifying each section on the design to one of over 160 distinct colors for a look that is uniquely you. After color preferences, select from a selection of premium paper types to make sure you get the paper type that suites your style and look flawlessly. If that was not enough, Basic Invite provides over 40 distinct envelope colors to establish the correct tone for your vintage invites leading up to them even being opened.
If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."
The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."
There you have it: Everything you need to know about wedding invitation wording etiquette, complete with twenty-two example of how brides handled their own wording. Hopefully these real invites will help guide you as you create your own. No matter what you choose, keep it true to your own tastes and you'll come up with a wedding invitation you'll treasure forever!
The first line of the invitation is dedicated to the host of the wedding, also known as the party covering the expenses. Traditionally, the bride’s parents paid for the wedding but with changing times, the groom’s parents, bride and groom, or a combination of all three are contributing. There is no official order or requirement to list the names. It’s all up to personal preference.
Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
A lot of wedding event invite companies can offer a selection of themes where you just need to fill out the details names, locations as well as days. However, many couples favor to make their very own, to make the invite less tight and also more personalized. If so, here are a couple of guidelines:

If your wedding is going to be decorated with bows, small or large, try using them in the wedding invitations as well. You will be able to create a greater effect, especially if your guests discover that the bows were not only included in the invitations but also used as a form of decoration at the wedding itself. They’re really easy to make and are guaranteed to lend your elegant wedding invitations a charming appearance.
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