Your wedding should be one of the most memorable things to happen in your life, but there are some things that you have to sort out along the way. Whether you are forced to invite people you barely know to appease your parents or feel compelled to ask your boss on the day you say “I do”. you know that no matter how grand or low-key you want the day to be, you need to impress your family, friends, and guests of the effort you planned on your big day. First impressions, especially your wedding invitations, will set the tone of just how impressive your guests expect your wedding to be. Not only does the letter provide the essential details of your wedding, but it also sets the tone of the event.
Not sure how to word your wedding invitations? It might seem simple at first, but once you get started, you may realize that crafting the perfect wedding invitation wording can be a little tricky—there are etiquette rules to navigate and maybe a couple of sticky situations to figure out. But in a nutshell, the wording of your invitation should reflect the overall vibe of your wedding day. Ready to get started? We've compiled this guide to wedding invitation wording and etiquette right here.
Very formal invitations include this information on a separate card. Otherwise, it can be printed on the wedding invitation itself if there is room; if the ceremony and reception are held in the same location, you may print "and afterward at the reception" or "reception immediately following." When the reception is elsewhere, the location goes on a different line.

In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster), they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express anything from your values to the kind of wedding you’re going to have to your artistic taste. But wedding invitation wording still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)
The first line of the invitation is dedicated to the host of the wedding, also known as the party covering the expenses. Traditionally, the bride’s parents paid for the wedding but with changing times, the groom’s parents, bride and groom, or a combination of all three are contributing. There is no official order or requirement to list the names. It’s all up to personal preference.
Your (amazing!) invitations should arrive in mailboxes six to eight weeks before your wedding, again allowing extra if guests will need to arrange time off and air travel. Set your RSVP date three to four weeks prior to your wedding so you’ll have time to follow up on missing responses before you have to give final numbers to your vendors. A great tip is to use an invisible ink UV pen to mark your response cards with numbers corresponding to your guest list. It’s common to receive back several RSVP’s with no name, and the number system allows you to identify the responders. The UV part keeps it all discreet and the envelope pristine.

Wedding Information: This is arguably the most critical section of the wedding invitation. It tells your guests where the event will take place and exactly when to arrive. To satisfy tradition, write the dates out in full instead of using numbers. This looks a lot fancier and avoids any possible misunderstandings. “The Fifth of April, Two Thousand and Eighteen” is crystal clear. Depending on how you read it, 04/05/18 Could be May 4th or April 5th which would be a terrible mistake.


“The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service. Some couples opt to spell "honour" using the British spelling; both are correct but spelling it with a "u" evokes a more formal and traditional feel. (Note: If you're using "honour" on the invitation, we recommend matching it with "favour" as in "favour of your reply" on the RSVP card.)
The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.
The M line: The “M” line on the RSVP card is the place where guests will write in their names. The "M" itself is meant to designate the first letter of the formal salutation (Mr., Mrs., Miss or Ms.), which the guest would write along with their name(s). The most traditional weddings might use the “M” line; for less formal celebrations, we suggest the more straightforward “Name(s)” instead.
The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.
If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.

A lot of wedding event invite companies can offer a selection of themes where you just need to fill out the details names, locations as well as days. However, many couples favor to make their very own, to make the invite less tight and also more personalized. If so, here are a couple of guidelines:
The Invitation Line: This is where you actually invite people. “The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service while “The pleasure of your company” is used to denote a secular one, though you can use any phrasing you want. This is where you actually ask people to join you, so feel free to set the tone with anything from “Invite you to share their joy as…” to “Want you to come party with us when…”

For different-sex couples, the bride’s name typically goes first, followed by the groom's name. If the bride’s parents’ names are listed at the top, the bride’s name can just be her first and middle name (without last name), while the groom’s name is listed in full, or his first and middle names are listed, followed by the line “Son of Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Wong.”


Nevertheless, the invitation also acts as a keepsake of a special celebration, as well as a news of a couple's love. Like the wedding itself, it has to be beautiful and also personal.


Now that you have the basics covered, it’s time to get specific. The first question is; who’s name goes first, the bride or the groom? Traditionally, whoever is hosting the wedding will get first billing. This is usually the Bride’s parents, making the Bride’s name the appropriate choice. In cases where there are co-hosts or two brides, the couple will have to decide for themselves. If you’re having difficulty, say the names out loud and see if any option has a better ring to it.
Most couples really feel as though they are no various from their organic moms and dads when it comes to tip moms and dads. So, they wish to integrate them into the invitation too. And also while traditionally, the parents are consisted of, how do you place in everybody's name?
In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster), they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express anything from your values to the kind of wedding you’re going to have to your artistic taste. But wedding invitation wording still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)
Momental Designs Unique Wedding Invitations featuring the artwork of Kristy Rice. We love to create handmade custom wedding invitations, unique wedding invitations, birth announcements and stationery. We create unique wedding stationery including custom programs, wedding menus, custom seating charts and seating cards. We also offer bat mitzvah, bar mitzvah invitations, party invitations, wedding shower invitations, baby shower invitations. If you are searching for a handmade custom invitation, a unique party invitation, bridal shower invitation, or even a beach themed wedding invitation please contact us.. We love to create destination wedding invitations, hand-painted invitations and very artistic invitations.
Vintage chic weddings are becoming popular and are an elegant display of old world charm with a modern twist. Modern brides are putting emphasis on vintage design for their wedding ceremonies and all correspondences, including vintage wedding invitations. Elegantweddinginvites.com is providing vintage wedding invitations with high quality and affordable price. Our vintage designs wedding invites can add a touch of romance to your wedding celebration, such as the lace wedding invites, whether it be designs decorated with real lace or a printed pattern. They remind guests of a bygone eras, traditions and old fashion etiquette. Click any image and start to customize, and then you can seal and send out your vintage wedding invitations to set the right tone for your upcoming nuptial.
×