Sending out your wedding invitations is an exciting step in the wedding planning process! If addressing all of your invites is a daunting process to you, recipient addressing is the answer to your prayers. Don’t forget to include RSVP cards and to take advantage of RSVP functions on your wedding website in case any RSVPs get lost in the mail. Remember to hold on to a couple of invitations — they are perfect for scrapbooking, crafting and including in a shadow box or photo book! After the wedding, make sure to send your attendees thank you cards to show them how much you value their love and support.
Create your own wedding color theme. With the capability to revise each section on the invite to one of over 160 colors you have the capability to put together a color theme that is truly distinct. Don't settle for an online invite company that limits you to three or four predefined color schemes. Expect more and build your own distinct wedding color theme with Basic Invite where your color preferences are unlimited.
For different-sex couples, the bride’s name typically goes first, followed by the groom's name. If the bride’s parents’ names are listed at the top, the bride’s name can just be her first and middle name (without last name), while the groom’s name is listed in full, or his first and middle names are listed, followed by the line “Son of Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Wong.”
There you have it: Everything you need to know about wedding invitation wording etiquette, complete with twenty-two example of how brides handled their own wording. Hopefully these real invites will help guide you as you create your own. No matter what you choose, keep it true to your own tastes and you'll come up with a wedding invitation you'll treasure forever!
In this case, the invitation includes the bride's parents’ names, so you can omit the bride's last name (unless she has a different last name than her parents). On the following line, write out the groom’s entire name. LGBTQ+ wedding invitation wording should follow similar guidelines. The host of the celebration (read: the party footing the bill) is listed first, followed by their son or daughter’s name, followed by their son or daughter’s partner’s name. If the couple is hosting themselves, names are typically listed in alphabetical order.

You can include another small insert revealing your new address if you are moving to a brand-new home after the wedding.
Wedding invitations, in particular, indicate how the event should appear, and also show what the bride and groom expect from their guests as well. Thanks to technology, there are numerous ways to send out wedding invitations -- even to your loved ones halfway across the globe. Paper invitations that your guests receive in the mail add a certain charm and elegance to the event, and will make people feel special due to its nature. On the other hand, email and social media make updating that much easier, because everything gets done in real-time, so you know how many people to expect, and your guests could get updates from your end as quickly, too.

The Invitation Line: This is where you actually invite people. “The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service while “The pleasure of your company” is used to denote a secular one, though you can use any phrasing you want. This is where you actually ask people to join you, so feel free to set the tone with anything from “Invite you to share their joy as…” to “Want you to come party with us when…”
Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
Your wedding should be one of the most memorable things to happen in your life, but there are some things that you have to sort out along the way. Whether you are forced to invite people you barely know to appease your parents or feel compelled to ask your boss on the day you say “I do”. you know that no matter how grand or low-key you want the day to be, you need to impress your family, friends, and guests of the effort you planned on your big day. First impressions, especially your wedding invitations, will set the tone of just how impressive your guests expect your wedding to be. Not only does the letter provide the essential details of your wedding, but it also sets the tone of the event.
If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
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