Invitations usually give us a peep into what the wedding’s theme and decor will look like. A simple white, sprayed with a bit of beige or pale champagne pink will go well with any other colour. It’s a real classic with an essence of elegance, and it also matches any sort of decoration. This is just one of many gorgeous DIY wedding invitation cards.
Your wedding invitation is one of the first elements of your wedding your guests will see. Your wedding invitation wording and invitation design clue your guests into details like your wedding’s formality, color scheme, and overall tone. Finding the perfect wording can be a challenge but this guide will help you find the right wedding invitation wording for you.
The M line: The “M” line on the RSVP card is the place where guests will write in their names. The "M" itself is meant to designate the first letter of the formal salutation (Mr., Mrs., Miss or Ms.), which the guest would write along with their name(s). The most traditional weddings might use the “M” line; for less formal celebrations, we suggest the more straightforward “Name(s)” instead.
If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.
The Host Line: The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding. In times past, the bride’s family always hosted (and paid for) the wedding. Thankfully, those days are done. Hosting the wedding is, in the end, a (mostly meaningless) honor that you get to choose how to pass out. Both (or all) your sets/singles of parents can be listed as hosts. If you have five sets of parents and you want to list them all—go for it. One set of parents might be listed as hosts. You can host the wedding yourself, in which case the lines are reversed “Terry and Renee invite you to…” or the host line is omitted entirely. You can also make the host line more general “Together with their families.” There are two issues worth noting here. Firstly, no matter who says what in the course of guilting you, the host line on the wedding invitation isn’t for sale; it’s an honor that you should bestow in a way that makes you feel comfortable. Names are not listed in order of who paid more (or who paid at all). And secondly, this particular honor is generally only used for the living (since these people are, ostensibly, inviting you to a party). A common way to honor the dead is to alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Renee Smith, daughter of Beth Smith,” or “Renee Smith, daughter of Iris Milfrid and the late Beth Smith.”
For different-sex couples, the bride’s name typically goes first, followed by the groom's name. If the bride’s parents’ names are listed at the top, the bride’s name can just be her first and middle name (without last name), while the groom’s name is listed in full, or his first and middle names are listed, followed by the line “Son of Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Wong.”
There are thousands of ready-made wedding celebration invitations to choose from; just choose a layout, send the information, and also the printer can have it all set within weeks. With such a broad option, it might be challenging to pick which one is ideal.
In reality, wedding invitation wording is a place where you might want to get creative… but not TOO creative. No matter what beautiful form they come in (old fashioned post, email, on a balloon, sent by a flock of pigeons, unrolled as a poster), they still need to convey some basic information. Who are you? What are you doing? When and where are you doing it? How you share that information can express anything from your values to the kind of wedding you’re going to have to your artistic taste. But wedding invitation wording still is, in its most basic form, a simple means of passing along information. Nothing more, nothing less. (So tell your mom to calm down.)

Host Line: This line is dedicated to honoring the host. This is typically the Bride’s parents and should begin with the father and then the mother. This is the formal way to write it, but with today’s etiquette, it’s very much appreciated to include both sets of parents. If you are paying and hosting the wedding yourself, place your own names starting with the groom.
The request line is where you invite people to attend your wedding (a.k.a. "Please come!"), so use this section to set the tone for your celebration. If your wedding is formal, use more formal language to reflect the occasion (e.g., "request the honor of your presence…"); if your wedding is casual, use less formal language (e.g., "Would love for you to join them..." or "Want you to come party with us…"). Here are a few more things to keep in mind:
Whichever kind of wedding invitation to go with, they should have an eye-catching design or creative invitation. It would help grab your guests’ attention, at the same time, maintain the theme and overall aesthetics that you want your wedding to have. Crafting the perfect invitation is vital in impressing your guests, but more importantly, it will set the tone that you want for your big day so that they can dress accordingly for the event. After all, you don’t want your friends to wear to the nines for a beach wedding, or show up in flip-flops for your elegant, black-tie banquet.
The Party Line: What’s coming after the wedding? This is both your time to get celebratory and your time to give guests a solid idea of what to expect. If you’re not serving a full meal, this would be a great place to say “Cake, punch, and revelry to follow”; this line could also say “Dinner and dancing immediately following,” or inform them of a gap of time or location change, “Party to follow at 7pm at Delfina.” You can also use this line to just get creative and set the tone for the celebration. “Wild celebration to follow,” “Confetti and magic to follow,” “Join us for an intimate dinner following…” Here, the sky really is the limit.
Whichever kind of wedding invitation to go with, they should have an eye-catching design or creative invitation. It would help grab your guests’ attention, at the same time, maintain the theme and overall aesthetics that you want your wedding to have. Crafting the perfect invitation is vital in impressing your guests, but more importantly, it will set the tone that you want for your big day so that they can dress accordingly for the event. After all, you don’t want your friends to wear to the nines for a beach wedding, or show up in flip-flops for your elegant, black-tie banquet.

The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.

×