You can absolutely switch up your wedding invitation wording to include the name of a deceased loved. One tactful and meaningful way to do this is to change the format slightly to accommodate the word "late" in front of your family member’s name. (Beyond the invitation wording, you have plenty of ways to honor a deceased parent during your ceremony and reception.) It can look something like this.
A lot of wedding event invite companies can offer a selection of themes where you just need to fill out the details names, locations as well as days. However, many couples favor to make their very own, to make the invite less tight and also more personalized. If so, here are a couple of guidelines:

One of the most essential things, that an invitation needs to contain, is the location and the precise date and time of the wedding. If you want your guests to save the date automatically, you can place a calendar on the invitation and mark the big day with a heart. It will be easy to spot and it will be easy to memorise. You can see a great example of this idea in the picture above. Calendar cards are great handmade wedding invitations.

If among the couple members wish to include their moms and dad that has actually passed on, they can claim something to the effect of 'boy of Mr. Smith and also the late Mrs. Smith.' That functions simply fine. If both parents are deceased, you may want to keep in mind that as 'boy of the late Mr. and Mrs.'
Emails, Texts, or good old fashioned snail mail, make sure to consider all of the pros and cons. Some methods are faster, more convenient, and easier to make changes to if the need arises. Setting up a Facebook page and event, for example, is a really quick and easy way to spread the word and keep track of your RSVPs. But, some of your guests may not be too tech savvy or check their inbox very often.
The Invitation Line: This is where you actually invite people. “The honor of your presence” is traditionally used to denote a religious service while “The pleasure of your company” is used to denote a secular one, though you can use any phrasing you want. This is where you actually ask people to join you, so feel free to set the tone with anything from “Invite you to share their joy as…” to “Want you to come party with us when…”
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
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