When guests open their wedding invitation, the first thing they see is your overall design. Your design should reflect the personal style of your wedding. There are many invitation styles to choose from — ornate, minimalist, rustic, vintage, artistic, whimsical, classic or modern. Consider including some of these additional design elements in your wedding invitation:
Your (amazing!) invitations should arrive in mailboxes six to eight weeks before your wedding, again allowing extra if guests will need to arrange time off and air travel. Set your RSVP date three to four weeks prior to your wedding so you’ll have time to follow up on missing responses before you have to give final numbers to your vendors. A great tip is to use an invisible ink UV pen to mark your response cards with numbers corresponding to your guest list. It’s common to receive back several RSVP’s with no name, and the number system allows you to identify the responders. The UV part keeps it all discreet and the envelope pristine.
If among the couple members wish to include their moms and dad that has actually passed on, they can claim something to the effect of 'boy of Mr. Smith and also the late Mrs. Smith.' That functions simply fine. If both parents are deceased, you may want to keep in mind that as 'boy of the late Mr. and Mrs.'
Wedding Information: This is arguably the most critical section of the wedding invitation. It tells your guests where the event will take place and exactly when to arrive. To satisfy tradition, write the dates out in full instead of using numbers. This looks a lot fancier and avoids any possible misunderstandings. “The Fifth of April, Two Thousand and Eighteen” is crystal clear. Depending on how you read it, 04/05/18 Could be May 4th or April 5th which would be a terrible mistake.
The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.
Template.net offers a multitude of wedding invitations to fit any theme or style that you want. From classy and elegant letters to vintage and hipster aesthetics, laid-back beach weddings, or even themed events. Like from bridal shower invitations, formal invitation to anniversary invitation cards, everything is available right on this website. Each of these templates comes with high-quality photos and graphics, with a stunning 300 dpi resolution for a beautiful invitation quality on paper or online. We frame all of our templates to be used conveniently in both soft and hardcopy. Take a look at our vast template gallery and download your perfect wedding invitation now.
We understand that your Wedding Invitation is one of the most significant keepsakes of your lifetime. Our collection offers styles and DIY designs to give every couple an invitation to love forever. From classic to casual, traditional to modern, add your custom details in beautiful fonts and colors. For an extra personal touch, choose an invitation that includes your uploaded photos, featured or overlaid with text. Create your own wedding monogram and add it to your invitation design to make it extra special.
Most couples choose to include a separate response card for guests to fill out and return in the mail. You also have the option of having people RSVP via your wedding website. If that's the case, include the website address on a separate card, just as you would with an RSVP card, and indicate that guests can let you know if they can come directly on the site.
The Names: This line seems self-evident until you start thinking about the details. Whose name goes first? (That honor traditionally belongs to the bride, but what if there are two brides? Or all grooms? Or you just don’t want to do it that way?) Will you list both last names, or one last name, or no last names? Will the names be on the same line or different lines? There are no right or wrong answers (though I’m partial to listing everyone’s last name), but several good questions.
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
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