Dress code: Including a line about the wedding's dress code is optional but can be helpful for guests; however, if your wedding is black tie, you must include that on the invitation. If you don't include dress code information on the invitation, then guests will infer attire details based on the formality of the wedding invitation itself (i.e., if the invitation is very fancy, guests will likely anticipate a formal affair). The dress code line should be listed on a line following the reception location.

You can absolutely switch up your wedding invitation wording to include the name of a deceased loved. One tactful and meaningful way to do this is to change the format slightly to accommodate the word "late" in front of your family member’s name. (Beyond the invitation wording, you have plenty of ways to honor a deceased parent during your ceremony and reception.) It can look something like this.


If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.
It might seem awkward, yet it can be done. Other couples have chosen to simply consist of the names of their biological parents, referencing their existing last names. That works just.

If you don’t want a typical wedding invitation then this just might be the one for you. These elegant wedding invitations don’t need to be put in separate envelopes, because the front of the card is already so breath-taking in itself. It’s classy with an edge. A good idea on how to design the middle of the card is to write the important information about the wedding on one side, and on the other side, you can attach the response card with an envelope. This way, if replying via post, it will be easier for your guests to respond whether they can make it or not.
Although on most of the occasions, people do make the best usage of pre-defined templates and majestic themes to give shape to their wedding invitation cards, but the best ones out of them are handmade. Handmade wedding templates offer the maximum level of sophistication and customization in the theme and look & feel of the template as compared to any other template.You can also see vintage wedding invitation templates.
Now that you have the basics covered, it’s time to get specific. The first question is; who’s name goes first, the bride or the groom? Traditionally, whoever is hosting the wedding will get first billing. This is usually the Bride’s parents, making the Bride’s name the appropriate choice. In cases where there are co-hosts or two brides, the couple will have to decide for themselves. If you’re having difficulty, say the names out loud and see if any option has a better ring to it.
There are thousands of ready-made wedding celebration invitations to choose from; just choose a layout, send the information, and also the printer can have it all set within weeks. With such a broad option, it might be challenging to pick which one is ideal.
If you want to include the name of a parent who is deceased, you’ll need to rearrange things a bit, as someone who has passed can't actually serve as a host. A common way to honor a deceased parent is alongside a member of the couple’s name as “Olivia French, daughter of Susan French,” or “Olivia French, daughter of Michael French and the late Susan French."
Your (amazing!) invitations should arrive in mailboxes six to eight weeks before your wedding, again allowing extra if guests will need to arrange time off and air travel. Set your RSVP date three to four weeks prior to your wedding so you’ll have time to follow up on missing responses before you have to give final numbers to your vendors. A great tip is to use an invisible ink UV pen to mark your response cards with numbers corresponding to your guest list. It’s common to receive back several RSVP’s with no name, and the number system allows you to identify the responders. The UV part keeps it all discreet and the envelope pristine.
The first line of the wedding invitation is where you list who’s hosting the wedding (a.k.a. who is paying for the wedding). Traditionally, this was usually the bride's parents, so listing their names on the host line was a way of acknowledging that generosity. These days, however, more and more couples are either paying for the wedding themselves (in this case, you can omit the host line entirely) or receiving financial contributions from parents on both sides—in this case, you can list all parents' names or opt for something simpler like, "Together with their parents" or "Together with their families."
Basic Invite makes it painless to put together the ultimate card from the coziness of your casa. With a unequaled editor, Basic Invite gives you the ability to revise your fonts, colors, and even add photos with a online preview, so you can see perfectly what your design will print like without requiring you to wait on a designer or go see a design studio.
×