Traditional wedding invitation wording has spent decades slowly evolving into what we see today. The past few decades, however, have been the most drastic. Not to worry. traditional wording for wedding invites can be easily adapted to work for our modern families including divorced parents, single parents, multiple sets of parents, and all of the other structures. This structured wedding invitation wording also works perfectly well for couples who are hosting their own celebration.
Invitations usually give us a peep into what the wedding’s theme and decor will look like. A simple white, sprayed with a bit of beige or pale champagne pink will go well with any other colour. It’s a real classic with an essence of elegance, and it also matches any sort of decoration. This is just one of many gorgeous DIY wedding invitation cards.
Now that you have the basics covered, it’s time to get specific. The first question is; who’s name goes first, the bride or the groom? Traditionally, whoever is hosting the wedding will get first billing. This is usually the Bride’s parents, making the Bride’s name the appropriate choice. In cases where there are co-hosts or two brides, the couple will have to decide for themselves. If you’re having difficulty, say the names out loud and see if any option has a better ring to it.
Not sure how to word your wedding invitations? It might seem simple at first, but once you get started, you may realize that crafting the perfect wedding invitation wording can be a little tricky—there are etiquette rules to navigate and maybe a couple of sticky situations to figure out. But in a nutshell, the wording of your invitation should reflect the overall vibe of your wedding day. Ready to get started? We've compiled this guide to wedding invitation wording and etiquette right here.

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If there is a parent that has been absent for the child's life, after that they do not need to be taken into the invitation.
Your wedding should be one of the most memorable things to happen in your life, but there are some things that you have to sort out along the way. Whether you are forced to invite people you barely know to appease your parents or feel compelled to ask your boss on the day you say “I do”. you know that no matter how grand or low-key you want the day to be, you need to impress your family, friends, and guests of the effort you planned on your big day. First impressions, especially your wedding invitations, will set the tone of just how impressive your guests expect your wedding to be. Not only does the letter provide the essential details of your wedding, but it also sets the tone of the event.
The request line is where you invite people to attend your wedding (a.k.a. "Please come!"), so use this section to set the tone for your celebration. If your wedding is formal, use more formal language to reflect the occasion (e.g., "request the honor of your presence…"); if your wedding is casual, use less formal language (e.g., "Would love for you to join them..." or "Want you to come party with us…"). Here are a few more things to keep in mind:
If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.

Emails, Texts, or good old fashioned snail mail, make sure to consider all of the pros and cons. Some methods are faster, more convenient, and easier to make changes to if the need arises. Setting up a Facebook page and event, for example, is a really quick and easy way to spread the word and keep track of your RSVPs. But, some of your guests may not be too tech savvy or check their inbox very often.
Not sure how to word your wedding invitations? It might seem simple at first, but once you get started, you may realize that crafting the perfect wedding invitation wording can be a little tricky—there are etiquette rules to navigate and maybe a couple of sticky situations to figure out. But in a nutshell, the wording of your invitation should reflect the overall vibe of your wedding day. Ready to get started? We've compiled this guide to wedding invitation wording and etiquette right here.
Every couple is different, and although the differences between all of these wedding invitation wording styles are subtle, it’s important to say things in a way which reflects who you are and the type of wedding you want to have. Perfecting your wedding invite wording may have seemed complicated at first, but If you follow our guide and match it with your hopes, dreams, and theme you’ll have no trouble at all.

For different-sex couples, the bride’s name typically goes first, followed by the groom's name. If the bride’s parents’ names are listed at the top, the bride’s name can just be her first and middle name (without last name), while the groom’s name is listed in full, or his first and middle names are listed, followed by the line “Son of Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Wong.”

Wedding invitation etiquette dictates that the dress code, if it's to be included on the invitation, is is the lower right hand corner of the invitation. If you don't include a note on attire, the invitation will indicate the dress code. For example, if the invitation is very fancy, guests will likely anticipating a formal, black-tie affair, or conversely, if the invitation on the simpler side, that indicates a more casual dress code.

When guests open their wedding invitation, the first thing they see is your overall design. Your design should reflect the personal style of your wedding. There are many invitation styles to choose from — ornate, minimalist, rustic, vintage, artistic, whimsical, classic or modern. Consider including some of these additional design elements in your wedding invitation:


For different-sex couples, the bride’s name typically goes first, followed by the groom's name. If the bride’s parents’ names are listed at the top, the bride’s name can just be her first and middle name (without last name), while the groom’s name is listed in full, or his first and middle names are listed, followed by the line “Son of Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Wong.”

If you are attempting to regulate the number of guests, put a little card that says, "We have scheduled __ seats for you." This is a respectful as well as refined way of minimizing the headcount.


Wedding invitations, in particular, indicate how the event should appear, and also show what the bride and groom expect from their guests as well. Thanks to technology, there are numerous ways to send out wedding invitations -- even to your loved ones halfway across the globe. Paper invitations that your guests receive in the mail add a certain charm and elegance to the event, and will make people feel special due to its nature. On the other hand, email and social media make updating that much easier, because everything gets done in real-time, so you know how many people to expect, and your guests could get updates from your end as quickly, too.

Nevertheless, the invitation also acts as a keepsake of a special celebration, as well as a news of a couple's love. Like the wedding itself, it has to be beautiful and also personal.

If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.


Invitations usually give us a peep into what the wedding’s theme and decor will look like. A simple white, sprayed with a bit of beige or pale champagne pink will go well with any other colour. It’s a real classic with an essence of elegance, and it also matches any sort of decoration. This is just one of many gorgeous DIY wedding invitation cards.
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